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Golf

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Created on 02 May 2013 Written by Scott McCormick

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Category: Golf
Published on 02 May 2013
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The sporting landscape has been transformed in the past decade by advanced statistical methodologies which have revolutionized the way participants, commentators and normal fans look at the games they love.

It started with the sabermetric movement in baseball, which has gradually grown over the past 20 years from an unorthodox hobby of a handful of data nerds to a virtual cottage industry, with analysts utilizing technological innovations and advanced statistical concepts to not only help fans obtain a greater understanding of the sport, but also assist Major League teams in making day-to-day decisions about the personnel and strategy they employ during individual games and seasons.

Taking baseball’s lead, other sports have gotten into the advanced analytics game as well, and now there are specialists parsing data in every discipline across the sporting spectrum.

Golf is no exception, as an explosion of number crunching has swept the PGA tour with the help of high-tech equipment which gives statistics gurus access to data that previous generations could only dream about.

Take the PGA Tour’s ShotLink system, which measures the flight path and landing spot of each and every shot taken on the tour within inches of exact accuracy.  Golf Analytics – the science of logical, quantitative analysis of the sport – has burst into the mainstream, with cold hard facts helping to give a fuller picture of concepts that were once only hypothesized about through subjectivity and intuition.

Golf, like other sports, has always relied heavily on statistics to judge individual players’ capabilities, but modern advanced data sets have proven to be a much better predictor of future success than the limited numbers of yore.

Some of the ideas revealed by careful analysis of new data have been shown to be of particular value to players trying to improve their game.  For instance, analysis using the aforementioned ShotLink data showed that players on the putting green shooting for birdie were less effective than if they were shooting that exact same shot for par.

This statistical finding reveals a glimpse into the inner-psyche of golfers, both tour pros and everyday amateurs – when faced with the chance to mark a birdie on the scorecard, players naturally revert to a “loss aversion” mentality that dictates an individual’s tendency to avoid loss rather than seeking gains.

Analysts concluded that on birdie putts, golfers remain worried about being able to two-putt to save par instead of taking full advantage of the opportunity to nail the birdie.  Whereas, on par putts, the chief concern is that a miss could lead to a negative outcome, a bogey, so the putter aims directly for the cup, and therefore is more likely to achieve the goal.

The study went on to suggest that if a top flight PGA tour golfer could correct this seemingly innate human tendency to shy away from risk, and take the same approach on birdie shots as they do on par strokes, it could be worth as much as a million dollars per year in tour earnings!

It is these types of insights that the statistical revolution in golf is able to help generate, and many golf analysts believe that we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the things we can discern when we analyze the mountains of data that can now be collected on the PGA tour.  The future will likely hold more interesting revelations on the sport of golf, as analysts continue to parse new statistical sets and test their hypotheses against the cold hard data.

About the Author: Detailed statistical analysis suggests that Scott McCormick could have avoided over $250 in golf gambling losses in the last year if he stopped betting against players who are clearly better than him.   When he isn’t making dubious financial decisions, Scott works as a freelance golf writer for GolfNow.com, which offers discount golf tee-times on courses from San Diego to Boston, Vancouver to Naples, and all points in between.

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Last Updated on 21 March 2014
 
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Created on 04 March 2013 Written by Adwait Kulkarni (Admin)

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Category: Golf
Published on 04 March 2013
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Out of all of the sports out there, one could argue that golf is the one where players rely the most on statistics. Whether a player plays on the professional circuit or just every Sunday morning with a group of friends, by the end of the round they are sure to analyse their game and calculate all of the areas in which they dropped shots.

 

Of course, some stats are more important than others. Taking this into account, I'll now look at the three areas which I deem most important for golf. I'll analyse the biggest hitters, the guys who go round in the least amount of putts and also those that hit the most amount of fairways. I should note that this has been compiled through the PGA Tour statistics, meaning that some players may not be mentioned as they have not participated on this schedule.

 

Average Driving Distance

 

When I scoured through the average driving statistics, the first thing that sprang to mind was that I'd never heard of the player that was leading this table. With an average of 309.6 yards, Ryan Palmer was the top of the average drives. However, he has recently slipped outside the top 100, which gives the first indication that this statistic has little to do with end performance. In fact, out of the top ten big hitters on the PGA Tour, only one of them is placed in the top 100. That man is Robert Garrigus, with his 303.7 yard average helping establish himself in the top forty.

 

As you filter down the list you do start to see some bigger names, with the likes of Boo Weekley, Bubba Watson and Bradley Keegan in and around the top thirty. However, considering the emphasis some players place on ripping drives as far as they can, it's interesting to see that there is little correlation between this and end success.

 

Putts Per Round

 

It is always a bit difficult to analyse the putting statistics, as each provide different levels of clarity. For example, while one player might have a lower putts per round average, this might be because they narrowly miss the green on a lot of holes and subsequently chip and one putt. Nevertheless, there appears to be a little more correlation between this statistic and the world ranking.

 

According to the stats, Mike Weir is one of the best players on the green with an average of 26.94 putts per round. There was once a time when Weir was classed as one of the best players in the world but with the veteran now well outside the top 100, little can be taken from this information. Instead, we've got to look further down the list, with the likes of Charlie Wi, Aaron Baddeley and David Toms in and around the top ten. All of these players are regarded as solid professionals although again - none of them are anywhere near the top world ranking spots.

 

You've got to look a little further down to see the big guys, with Phil Mickelson in 25th position with an average of 28.25 putts per round. Brandt Snedeker isn't far behind him with 28.32 putts, while Robert Garrigus and Tim Clark find themselves in the top fifty of the list.

 

Suffice to say, it looks as though there is slightly more correlation with the putting stats - although the fact that very few of the top players on the Tour are mentioned on the list suggests that it is again not too important.

 

Average Driving Accuracy

 

Out of all three statistics mentioned in this article, this appears to be the most important. Jim Furyk leads the way with 75.68% of fairways hit, while the likes of David Toms, Tim Clark, Ian Poulter and Brandt Snedeker are all in the top ten. Considering the fact that all of these men are ranked very respectably in terms of world ranking, it can be assumed that the amount of fairways hit has a huge influence on score.

 

As you look further down the list, the likes of Lee Westwood, Boo Weekly and Zach Johnson all hit 66%+ of fairways and again, all of these men have decent world rankings.

 

This statistic can lead on to a conclusion for the entire article. While it is generally assumed that players "drive for show, putt for dough", the stats here indicate that driving accuracy is probably the most important stat out of the lot. Those men that hit the most fairways appear to have the best world rankings, with the putting average and driving distance having little impact. Of course, if these stats were to be analysed further, they would be combined with others to make them slightly more accurate. However, for the purposes of this article, it can be highlighted that accuracy is one of the most important attributes of the modern day golfer.

 

 

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Last Updated on 31 March 2014
 
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Created on 30 August 2010 Written by Adwait Kulkarni (Admin)

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Category: Golf
Published on 30 August 2010
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Golf technique - Adjusting to windTaking a short golf shot in the wind for instance, the 2nd or 3rd shot to the green would need some fine adjustments to be made. It would not be possible to use the normally chosen club because the wind would possibly deflect the ball off place ending up rough course or in the bunker.

The wind force is weakest at the ground. A good golf shot in the wind needs to keep the ball at low altitude. A general approach to accomplish the task is to use a longer club rather than a normal shorter one. The adjustments necessary to confine and balance the extra distance that would otherwise be made:
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Last Updated on 30 October 2012 Read more: Golf technique - Adjusting to wind
 
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Created on 31 December 2012 Written by Adwait Kulkarni (Admin)

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Category: Golf
Published on 31 December 2012
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Reasons You Really should Join A Golf ClubJoining a golf club has numerous benefits and rewards, compared to playing at various golf clubs. Lets take a appear at some of the benefits and factors to join a regional nation club.

(1) Most golf clubs, if not all golf clubs have a handicap tracking system, to hold track of your scores. You do not have to send your scorecard to a golf association for a legitimate handicap, to play in golf tournaments.

(2) Golf clubs have a facility with a locker room and restaurant as a meeting place. Consequently you get to know a great deal more fellow members, which make it a lot less difficult for you to obtain players to team up with.

(3) You happen to be way more probably to drive down to your nearby country club to practice, than you would at an unfamiliar golf program. Extra practice, suggests playing superior golf.

(4) Belonging to a golf club makes you play with a far better game plan strategy, given that of the familiarity of the golf program. Getting familiar with a golf program and knowing what lies ahead, tends to make you believe about your club choice.

(5) The yardage at the golf course on most golf holes becomes embedded in memory, which in turn provides you a far better understanding of your golf club yardage capabilities.

(6) A lot of golf clubs have a trade off method, which enables you to play at numerous golf courses in return for other members from other clubs, to play your golf course.

(7) You are more likely to play in way more golf tournaments. Golf clubs have a member's bulletin board, maintaining you informed on what upcoming occasions are coming up.

(8) When you pay a yearly green fee at a country club, you get to play unlimited golf. Specific days may very well be restricted for immediately after specific hours.

(9) If you join a golf club that has shares, the shares generally go up on the majority. It can have something to do with the golf frenzy.

(10) Last minute tee instances are a lot a lot easier to book, if the pro knows you belong to the golf club. The pro will simply discover you other members to join up with. Members get pleasure from meeting other members of the club.

(11) If you play golf a lot. Belonging to a golf club will conserve you a lot of funds in the extended run. There are various advantages and benefits in joining a nearby nation club. Check out the phone book, for some regional golf courses, or browse the Online for courses near your hometown. Play a few golf courses initially to see which golf challenge you would get pleasure from the greatest.

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Last Updated on 31 December 2012
 
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Created on 06 July 2010 Written by Adwait Kulkarni (Admin)

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Category: Golf
Published on 06 July 2010
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A lot of golfers agree to the fact that they hit precise shots with less power. While hitting the ball to go for a distance, the entire concentration of a golf player is on hitting it as hard as possible but the speed of the swing can alter the stance and the swinging plane, resulting adversely with the ball ending way off to the right of left of the green.

Making a perfect tee shot and driving it the whole yardage is advantageous on longer holes such as Par 5 holes. If you can make a well aimed soaring shot over most of the course it gives you several advantages over your opponents also you can set for a birdie or even an eagle. Some few techniques a golf player needs to practice at golf range with convenient distance markers available to estimate the length of your drive from the tee.

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Last Updated on 30 October 2012 Read more: Tips to make 300+ Yard Tee Shots
 

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